NETZEITUNG DEUTSCHLAND: Zusammenstöße zwischen Polizei und linken Demonstranten in Kiel

Nach zwei Kundgebungen gegen Rechts haben mehrere hundert Autonome versucht, zu einem Neonazi-Aufzug durchzudringen. Daraufhin kam es zu Auseinandersetzungen mit der Polizei.

siehe auch: Neo-Nazi-Skandal: NPD verhöhnt KZ-Opfer. Den Termin für seinen Aufmarsch wählte der rechte Mob mit zynischem Kalkül: Ausgerechnet in dieser Woche, 60 Jahre nach der Befreiung des Konzentrationslagers Auschwitz, in der die ganze Welt auf Deutschland schaut, versammelten sich gestern rund 450 Neonazis in Kiel (Schleswig-Holstein). Sie skandierten rechte Parolen wie „Ein Volk, ein Führer – die letzte Hoffnung für unser Land“. Marschierten mit Springerstiefeln durch die Innenstadt, bepöbelten Gegendemonstranten als „Ausländerbanden“. Und immer wieder hielten die Rechtsradikalen ein Plakat hoch, das furchtbare Assoziationen weckt, 10.000 Menschen demonstrierten gegen Rechtsextremismus, Schwere Krawalle nach Demonstrationen gegen Rechte in Kiel, Neonazi-Marsch in Kiel: Doch noch NPD-Verbot? Ausnahmezustand: 400 Neonazis, 6500 friedliche Gegendemonstranten, 500 Autonome und 2700 Polizisten legten Kiel lahm

Neonazi-Provokationen: Versammlungsfreiheit in Verruf – stern.de

Der Bogen spannt sich vom Hambacher Fest 1832 bis zu den Montagsdemos 1989 – die Geschichte der Versammlungsfreiheit ist eindrucksvoll. Provokationen von Neonazis lassen jetzt den Ruf nach einer Beschränkung laut werden.
Fast scheint es, als hätten die rechtsextremistischen Aufzüge der vergangenen Jahre eines erreicht: Die eindrucksvolle Geschichte der Versammlungsfreiheit, die vom Hambacher Fest von 1832 über die Studentenproteste der 68er bis zu den Montagsdemonstrationen in der DDR reicht, gerät langsam in Vergessenheit. Stattdessen wird die Sicht auf das edle Freiheitsrecht dadurch getrübt, dass Feinde der Freiheit es zu Provokationen in Anspruch nehmen.

Neonazi-Provokationen: Versammlungsfreiheit in Verruf – stern.de

Der Bogen spannt sich vom Hambacher Fest 1832 bis zu den Montagsdemos 1989 – die Geschichte der Versammlungsfreiheit ist eindrucksvoll. Provokationen von Neonazis lassen jetzt den Ruf nach einer Beschränkung laut werden.
Fast scheint es, als hätten die rechtsextremistischen Aufzüge der vergangenen Jahre eines erreicht: Die eindrucksvolle Geschichte der Versammlungsfreiheit, die vom Hambacher Fest von 1832 über die Studentenproteste der 68er bis zu den Montagsdemonstrationen in der DDR reicht, gerät langsam in Vergessenheit. Stattdessen wird die Sicht auf das edle Freiheitsrecht dadurch getrübt, dass Feinde der Freiheit es zu Provokationen in Anspruch nehmen.

Macleans.ca: Deputy prime minister doubts new western separatist movement has legs

Deputy Prime Minister Anne McLellan doesn’t believe the latest attempt to raise a western separatist movement will go far. Fringe politician Doug Christie, co-founder of the Western Canada Concept, was holding a recruitment meeting Saturday near Edmonton for a new federal party. (…)
Christie, a Victoria lawyer, is a champion of free speech and has defended Holocaust deniers Jim Keegstra and Ernst Zundel. He has also represented David Ahenakew, a former aboriginal leader charged with inciting hatred against Jews.

siehe auch: Western separatism floated. Fringe politician talks of ‘new nation’, Deputy prime minister doubts new western separatist movement has legs

Lansing State Journal: Hate groups’ presence is spread over state

Organizations’ numbers stable, but visibility up
(…) Still, experts say that while activity decreased after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, hate groups across the country are starting to become more vocal.
“More and more, we’re seeing extremist groups of all flavors start to stretch their muscles again,” said David Carter, a criminal justice professor at Michigan State University who works with the Justice Department and the FBI to train law enforcement personnel in how to handle extremist groups.
Carter said he is starting to see a growing presence of right-wing extremist groups, from neo-Nazis to racist skinheads to Christian identity groups – anti-Semitic and racist organizations that often depict Jews as biologically descended from Satan and consider nonwhites as soulless.

Lansing State Journal: Hate groups’ presence is spread over state

Organizations’ numbers stable, but visibility up
(…) Still, experts say that while activity decreased after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, hate groups across the country are starting to become more vocal.
“More and more, we’re seeing extremist groups of all flavors start to stretch their muscles again,” said David Carter, a criminal justice professor at Michigan State University who works with the Justice Department and the FBI to train law enforcement personnel in how to handle extremist groups.
Carter said he is starting to see a growing presence of right-wing extremist groups, from neo-Nazis to racist skinheads to Christian identity groups – anti-Semitic and racist organizations that often depict Jews as biologically descended from Satan and consider nonwhites as soulless.

OregonLive.com: Oregon man linked with neo-Nazi group wants summer event in Idaho

A man linked to a white supremacy group in Oregon is planning a gathering this summer in northern Idaho to honor the late neo-Nazi Aryan Nations founder Richard Butler.
Jim Ramm, self-described leader of an Oregon neo-Nazi group called “Tualatin Valley Skins,” said in an Internet posting that the July 1-4 event will include a videotape showing of Butler’s last sermon taped at his Hayden home three days before his death last September. The posting did not name a specific location where the event will be held, but said the gathering will occur near Athol, “about 13 miles from the original Aryan Nations site.”

OregonLive.com: Oregon man linked with neo-Nazi group wants summer event in Idaho

A man linked to a white supremacy group in Oregon is planning a gathering this summer in northern Idaho to honor the late neo-Nazi Aryan Nations founder Richard Butler.
Jim Ramm, self-described leader of an Oregon neo-Nazi group called “Tualatin Valley Skins,” said in an Internet posting that the July 1-4 event will include a videotape showing of Butler’s last sermon taped at his Hayden home three days before his death last September. The posting did not name a specific location where the event will be held, but said the gathering will occur near Athol, “about 13 miles from the original Aryan Nations site.”

The New Zealand Herald: Russia’s far-right on rise

Driven by crushing poverty, a lingering sense of humiliation after the collapse of the Soviet Union and outrage over Chechen separatist terror attacks, Russia’s skinheads are becoming increasingly organised, violent and numerous.
A report claims Russia’s youth is embracing the ideology their grandparents fought against so implacably, and that Russian skinheads, or britogolovy, now account for almost half the world’s “skins”.
Adhering to a blend of neo-Nazi ideology and rabid Russian nationalism, Russian skinheads are among the most violent, and have staged a wave of savage attacks on non-Russians and children as young as 5 in the past year, leaving many of their bleeding victims to die slowly.
Forty-four people were killed in racially motivated murders last year, more than double the previous year, human rights activists say. Many perpetrators were young, white skinheads shouting neo-Nazi or nationalist slogans. They rarely shoot their victims, preferring to stab them repeatedly or beat them to death with chains or knuckle-dusters.
The odds are always stacked in their favour because they hunt in packs of at least three and pick vulnerable targets. Their ranks seem only to swell, from about a dozen in the early 1990s to up to 60,000 today.

Jerusalem Post | Moscow: National-Bolshevik Party offices attacked

Dozens of assailants shouting neo-Nazi slogans attacked the offices of an extremist political organization that opposes the Kremlin and has sharply criticized an unpopular law replacing benefits with cash payments for millions of Russians, organization leaders and police said.
About 40 people, mostly young men, pushed their way into the Moscow headquarters of the unregistered National-Bolshevik Party and beat two of its members, the ITAR-Tass news agency reported, quoting party spokesman Alexander Averin. The assailants arrived in minibuses that were escorted by two cars, he said.